From broken hearts to joyous praise

The Amazing Thing about Ordinary

Most people older than ten have faced some sort of tragedy. Some of us experienced horror younger than that. A car accident or house fire The death of a loved one Parental divorce Abuse, neglect, or abandonment The list of bad things goes on and on. Yet we know that God redeems. The Bible tells us in Isaiah 61:3 that He exchanges beauty for ashes, or as the Contemporary English Version writes, The Lord has sent me to comfort those who mourn, especially in Jerusalem. He sent me to give them flowers in place of their sorrow, olive oil in place of tears, and joyous praise in place of broken hearts. But how do we get from broken hearts to joyous praise?
What if it gets worse?

Faith in the Midst of Health Problems

In my book The Warrior's Bride, I shared quite a bit about the health problems my husband endures. Chronic pain, back issues, migraines, leg cramps, and more are a regular part of our lives. I used to wonder what I was supposed to do with that. Were the physical struggles a test? A character building process? Would God heal him, or lead us to the doctor with the right procedure to make things better? And what does it say about our faith if nothing changes? What does it say about God if things get worse?

How Much is Enough?

A recent conversation among friends on Facebook recently got me thinking. Consider the original question: "How many articles of clothing (not including underwear, workout items, and pajamas) do you think you need? How many do you own? No condemnation...just a question." Does the question make you squirm? Is your closet overflowing? Do you have more than one closet full of clothes? Maybe clothes aren't your thing. Maybe it's jewelry. Or books. Or kitchen gadgets. Or collectible knick knacks. Or trips to the beach or the mountains. The basic question remains the same: How much is enough?
What does God want to see from us?

Does God Show Us the Proper Response to Tragedy?

Well-meaning friends. We've all been there: Looking at a friend or acquaintance going through something we don't understand, searching for the right words to say with only pithy sayings coming to mind. God never gives us more than we can handle. When God closes a door, somewhere He opens a window. Everything has a purpose. As someone who's walked through some heart-wrenching circumstances, can I tell you something? Yes, God can give us more than we handle. No, sometimes He doesn't open a window. And we may never see the purpose this side of heaven, and even then may not like what we discover. But what do we do with that? If we accept that as truth, then what is the proper response to tragedy? What does God want to see?
How kind are you?

The Secret to a Happier Life

How kind are you? Seriously ... on a scale of one to ten, where would you rate your kindness level? How often do you show appreciation? Are you gracious to others? Do you practice patience or speak compliments? Does the Golden Rule echo in your actions? Here is a simple, rule-of-thumb guide for behavior: Ask yourself what you want people to do for you, then grab the initiative and do it for them. Matthew 7:12, The Message Would your family or coworkers give you the same rating as you are giving yourself? Hmmm.
Can you imagine?

Gaining More Wisdom

Once upon a time, in a land far, far away, lived a young man named Solomon. He showed his love for the Lord by walking according to the instructions given him by his father David (1 Kings 3:3). Now, he wasn't perfect Now, he wasn't perfect. In fact, immediately after telling us that Solomon walked according to his father's instructions, it also says that he offered sacrifices and burned incense on the high places. A big no-no. Yet God honored his heart, coming to Solomon one night and saying, Ask for whatever you want me to give you (1 Kings 3:5). Can you imagine? How do you find wisdom?
What do you do?

When Your World is Falling Apart [3 Survival Keys]

When your world is falling apart, what do you do? I mean really, don't-know-if-you-can-breathe, falling apart. My gut reaction is to isolate and hibernate. I stay off social media and email, I don't leave my house or even answer my door. Chores may get done if they are critical, but otherwise, I tend to even ignore them. I'll likely function enough to offer the most basic care for my family, but by and large, I want to do nothing. The problem with this tendency is that it encourages greater negativity, increases mopiness, and generally demoralizes my already depressed mental state. Want proof my reaction is universal? (And the keys to coming out of it without serious intervention?)
Does motherhood matter?

The High Calling of Motherhood

My three kids are a huge part of my life. When I introduce myself, I frequently apply the labels wife and mother to myself, yet my role as a parent can also be a place I highly struggle. Over the last twenty years, I've found many joy-filled moments. My children have loved me, encouraged me, challenged me, and brought me a lot of laughter. As we prepare to launch a couple of them into the world, I look forward to all God will do in and through them. But, like most moms, I'm sometimes wonder if I did enough. This is one of the many questions Chimene Shipley Dupler tackles in The High Calling of Motherhood. "Motherhood is messy and hard. But it is also a gift" (page 28).
Are you stewarding well?

The Value of Talent

Hi, I'm Carrie, and I'm ... a wife, a stay-at-home mother, and a homeschooling mom. No matter the function or focus of the group I was with, these are the titles I would apply to myself when I had to introduce myself. And they are all truthful. But yet, they are, at the same time, deceptive. Ouch. You all know me better than that. Many of you know me as a ministry leader. You know that I'm an author of several books and that I publish a weekly blog. That is part of my life I usually hide. Why? Oh, the answer to that seems complex, but it really isn't.
Do you answer?

When Jesus Knocks for You

For some reason, our neighborhood is popular with door-to-door salesmen and religious visitors. Vacuum cleaner salesmen, college kids peddling magazines or books, Jehovah's Witnesses. About once a month, someone is knocking on our door. About once a month, I want to hide behind the curtains and pretend I'm not home. Sometimes I do. Good thing the peephole in my door doesn't work like a window. A Door Knocker in the Bible Did you know that a verse in the Bible mentions Jesus knocking on a door?