Book Review: Full Disclosure

I was hooked on Dee Henderson‘s writing from the first 50 pages of The Negotiator, a book she published in 2010 about a hostage negotiator and FBI agent. Not only does Full Disclosure introduce great new characters, it brings back many of my favorites from the O’Malley series.

Nothing says we have to limit who we love as family to just those who share our blood.

Book Description from Amazon

Ann Silver is a cop’s cop. As the Midwest Homicide Investigator, she is called in to help local law enforcement on the worst of cases, looking for answers to murder. Hers is one of the region’s most trusted investigative positions.

Paul Falcon is the FBI’s top murder cop in the Midwest. If the victim carried a federal badge or had a security clearance, odds are good Paul and his team see the case file or work the murder.

Their lives intersect when Ann arrives to pass a case off her desk and onto his. A car wreck and a suspicious death offer a lead on a hired shooter he is tracking. Paul isn’t expecting to meet someone, the kind that goes on the personal side of the ledger, but Ann Silver has his attention.

The better he gets to know her, the more Paul realizes her job barely scratches the surface of who she is. She knows spies and soldiers and U.S. Marshals, and has written books about them. She is friends with the former Vice President. People with good reason to be cautious about who they let into their lives deeply trust her. Paul wonders just what secrets Ann is keeping, until she shows him the John Doe Killer case file, and he starts to realize just who this lady he is falling in love with really is…

What I Thought

This book may be as different from the O’Malley series of books by Dee Henderson as it is similar. Yes, many of the characters make appearances, and yes, there are 30 mysteries to solve. Yet the true focus of the book felt like it was more on the characters and their interactions.

Ann Silver is her own mystery. She is an incredible person in her own right, and knowing how to keep secrets has earned the respect of many people in varied positions. Once the tragedy that haunts her is revealed, my respect for her deepened as I realized what she had overcome to be able to function as well as she does. Yet, it also holds her back.

Dee Henderson handled Ann’s growth throughout the story well, moving things slowly between her and Paul, giving Ann a realistic time to analyze and adjust. Paul’s character was just the mix of patience and pushiness that someone in Ann’s situation would need to be prodded into action without scaring her into running. It was beautiful as it unfolded.

Truthfully, the ending took me by surprise, but I also loved it. The character set up as the bad guy was not what I expected, and the sudden introduction of the thirty-first murder was the perfect solution to provide some relief to Ann’s fears.

The Bottom Line – 4-1/2 stars

Once again, Dee Henderson does not disappoint me. She has great skill at crafting a story with believable characters and events that keep me turning the page. I liked the slower pace of this one, the fact that it focused more on a lady with intense, largely hidden, pain, and a man who understood patience and gentle prodding were his allies. Although the book had some good suspense, this might be a better choice for those wanting something more character driven. If you prefer more action with your mystery, then grab the O’Malley series.

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DISCLOSURE: I purchased this book at a bookstore and was not asked by the author or publisher for a review. The opinions expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”